Some Hispanics With Jewish Roots Pursue an Exit Strategy: Emigrate to Spain

The New York Times:

Ana Maria Gallegos’s family has called this part of the West home for centuries. But after growing horrified by the resurgent racism she has seen across the United States, she reviewed her options and decided on a plan: emigrate to Spain.

Ms. Gallegos joined a growing number of Hispanics from the United States benefiting from a 2015 Spanish law seeking to atone for one of the grimmest chapters in Spain’s history: the expulsion of thousands of Sephardic Jews in 1492. The law offers citizenship to descendants of those Jews, many of whom converted to Catholicism but secretly adhered to Jewish traditions as they settled in New Mexico and other frontiers of the Spanish Empire.

The Spanish law does not require applicants to give up their existing citizenship and they do not have to be practicing Jews, but they must have their Sephardic ancestry confirmed by established Jewish organizations and pass demanding language and civics exams. Estimates vary on how many Americans might be eligible, since many Hispanics are unaware of their own Sephardic heritage. But scholars who specialize in Sephardic migration say that people with such ancestry number in the hundreds of thousands in the United States, if not more.

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Probably depends upon your comfort level with eating Jamón